Treat Your Suppliers as Friends

Want to know the challenges bedeviling NATO as it seeks to arm Ukraine? This week’s guest is as good a source as any, given how much the combination of Covid-19 and the war in Ukraine have put the focus on procurement. An area normally the “corporate equivalent of being sent to Siberia” (to quote this book) has now moved front-and-center. Triplat and the other three colleagues at the Boston Consulting Group (BCG) who collaborated on Profit from the Source emphasize the need not just to save costs, but for companies and their suppliers to join forces to optimize the innovation process together. Right now the average CEO spends no more than about 5% of his or her time on the procurement process. Since over 50% of a company’s expenditures involve suppliers, clearly a realignment of priorities is overdue.

Released today: episode #111 of my podcast series “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring Alenka Triplat Hoffman discussing Profit from the Source: Transforming Your Business by Putting Suppliers at the Core. Click on https://newbooksnetwork.com/category/special-series/dan-hills-eq-spotlight to get to the new episode.

Images of author Alenka Triplat and her new book titled "Profit From the Source: Transforming Your Business By Putting Suppliers at the Core" for Dan Hill's EQ Spotlight Podcast, episode number 111, titled "Treat Your Suppliers as Friends". Available on the "NewBooks Network" Podcast.

Alenka Triplat is a partner and managing director at the Boston Consulting Group, based in BCG’s Vienna office. She advises global leaders in the high-tech, defense, and industrial goods sectors.

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Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest books, available on Amazon are Emotionomics 2.0: The Emotional Dynamics Underlying Key Business Goals and Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo.

An Almost Unified Theory of Songwriting & Life

Brain teasers invite you; in contrast, brain embarrassers are songs listeners can’t get a handle on readily enough, causing them to give up and move on to another song. That contrast is but one of the many fine distinctions Mike Errico makes in this engaging, whimsical-and-yet-serious book about the art of crafting music. This episode spans a range from what constitutes a mission song (which lay out the story of the artist, e.g. Bruce Springsteen’s wanderlust), to what kind of flavor gets created depending on whether the melody starts on, before, or after the downbeat. Let’s take as Mike does some famous Beatles songs as a point of reference. Melodies that start on the downbeat feel authoritative (“Yesterday”). Melodies that start before the downbeat feel urgent, with the singer taking control (“She Loves You”). And those that follow the downbeat feel conversational (“All You Need Is Love”). Want to know about the Four Quadrants of Trust? That’s another reason to give this episode a listen.

Released today: episode #107 of my podcast series “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring Mike Errico, discussing Music, Lyrics, and Life: A Field Guide for the Advancing Songwriter. Click on https://newbooksnetwork.com/category/special-series/dan-hills-eq-spotlight to get to the new episode.

Images of author Mike Errico and his new book titled "Music, Lyrics, and Life: A Field Guide for the Advancing Songwriter" for Dan Hill's EQ Spotlight Podcast, episode number 107, titled "An Almost Unified Theory of Songwriting & Life". Available on the "NewBooks Network" Podcast.

Mike Errico is a New York-based record artist, writer, and lecturing professor at universities including Yale, Wesleyan, and NYU. Besides international touring, Mike has had his opinions and insights appear in the New York Times, the Wall Street Journal, Fast Company, and elsewhere.

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Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest books, available on Amazon are Emotionomics 2.0: The Emotional Dynamics Underlying Key Business Goals and Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo.

I Disagree: The Value of Rebellion

Imagine finding yourself working in the sponsorship arena because it’s the way to get a visa and stay in England. Well, that’s exactly what happened to Jackie Fast. Fortunately, she happens to have been very good at that kind of work. Within a few years, Fast’s ability to put brands together as co-sponsors for a variety of brands meant she was spending time, for instance, doing work for Richard Branson on an island he owns in the Caribbean! Not bad work if you can get it. From the vantage point of her highly successful, entrepreneurial career, what strikes Ms. Fast is how fast the world is changing. Few if any older executives will manage the transition, she believes, to a world where the internet has democratized big business and where Millennials and Gen Z-ers favor a values-based approach that puts enjoyable and meaningful work front and center.

Released today: episode #75 of my podcast series “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring Jackie Fast discussing Rule Breaker: Rebellious Leadership for the Future of Work. Click on https://newbooksnetwork.com/category/special-series/dan-hills-eq-spotlight to get to the new episode.

Images of Author Jackie Fast and her new book "Rule Breaker: Rebellious Leadership for the Future of Work" for Dan Hill's EQ Spotlight podcast, episode 75 "I Disagree: The Value of Rebellion"

Jackie Fast is the founder of the venture capital firm Sandbox Studios, which invests in celebrity-owned brands and has worked with The Rolling Stones, Red Bull, Zoom, Formula One, Virgin, Allianz and Universal Music among others.

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Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest books, available on Amazon are Emotionomics 2.0: The Emotional Dynamics Underlying Key Business Goals and Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo.

Rip Currents

An image of this question: Which of the 3 categories contributes the most top-10 trends? Is it economic, technological or social?

The correct answer is Economic, twice over. Not only does it provide half of all the top-10 trends or “undercurrents” in Jonathan Brill’s seminal book Rogue Waves, those economic trends also garner the most prominence by laying down the changing landscape (or “seascape”) that companies must navigate to protect and enrich their futures. What goes first? Changing demographics: the cost and availability of a company’s most precious resources: its personnel and its customers. Aging populations, a skilled labor shortage, and accelerating urbanization are the key emerging patterns in that case. Other trends that belong in the Economic category consist of the data economy, automation, the rise of Asia, and cheap money. The technological category encompasses the closing innovation window, and what Brill calls “remixing and convergence” (new combinations of existing technologies). Finally, the Social category addresses digital trust and new social contracts. This week’s new episode dips into several of these top-10 factors; to get to them all, buy Brill’s book!

Released today: episode #67 of my podcast series “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring Jonathan Brill discussing Rogue Waves: Future-Proof Your Business to Survive & Profit from Radical Change. Click on https://newbooksnetwork.com/category/special-series/dan-hills-eq-spotlight to get to the new episode.

Jonathan Brill is the former Global Futurist and Research Director for HP, a board member and advisor to the Chairman at Frost & Sullivan, and the Futurist-in-Residence at Territory Studio. Companies he’s consulted for over the years have generated over $27 billion from new revenue sources.

Image of NewBooks Network logo and Dan HIll's EQ Spotlight podcast logo

Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest books, available on Amazon are Emotionomics 2.0: The Emotional Dynamics Underlying Key Business Goals and Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo.

Emotions Create Habits

In the equation Behavior = Motivation & A_______ & prompt, what does A stand for? What’s your guess? Is it Ability, Aggravation or Absinthe?]

The correct answer to this week’s quiz is A because to change a habit you need to make it easy. Figure out which elements stand in the way, typically either time, money, physical effort, mental effort, or an unproductive routine. Find a weak link in what author BJ Fogg calls the Ability Chain, and you’ve found a way to break-through. Fogg has been in the business of helping people and companies change habits for a decade now and has a wonderful array of terminology and sayings. “Emotions create habits” is one of them. Another is “Decision and habit are opposites.” Still another is “Celebration is habit fertilizer.” Perhaps most important of all is “Simplicity changes behavior.” Give this episode a try, on behalf of making your listening to my podcast series one of your new habits!

Released today: episode #65 of my podcast series “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring BJ Fogg discussing Tiny Habits: The Small Changes That Change Everything. Click on https://newbooksnetwork.com/category/special-series/dan-hills-eq-spotlight to get to the new episode.

An image of Author BJ Fogg and the front cover of his new book "Tiny Habits: The Small Changes that Change Everything" for Dan Hill's EQ Spotlight newBooks network Podcast episode 65.

BJ Fogg founded the Behavior Design Lab at Stanford University. He teaches industry innovators and created the Tiny Habits Academy to help people around the world. He lives in Northern California and Maui.

Image of NewBooks Network logo and Dan HIll's EQ Spotlight podcast logo

Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest books, available on Amazon are Emotionomics 2.0: The Emotional Dynamics Underlying Key Business Goals and Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo.

Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest books, available on Amazon are Emotionomics 2.0: The Emotional Dynamics Underlying Key Business Goals and Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo.

Sensitive Strivers, Incorporated

An image of this question: There are five personality traits that belong to the Big-5 Model. Three are shown here: conscientiousness, neuroticism, and agreeableness. Which two of these three traits might best describe somebody who’s a Sensitive Striver? What’s your guess?

The correct answer to this week’s quiz is answers A and C, though B is hardly out of the question. That conclusion comes courtesy of Melody Wilding, a self-described Sensitive Striver. What characterizes this type of person in Wilding’s estimation? Sensitive Strivers tend to be sensitive obviously; also thoughtful, responsible, vigilant and full of inner drive. They’re committed and kind-hearted, hence conscientious about the details and eager to get along with others. Their tendency to be “over-everything” can get them into trouble. In other words, they’re perfectionists who get burdened with more work than they or anybody could readily handle. Stress results. To overcome what Wilding calls the Honor Roll Hangover and subsequent burn-out, she suggests cutting your to-do list by 70%. A safer route is to ditch an all-or-nothing approach for something more modulated and realistic. If you can do that and keep your job, another way others might describe you is a Miracle Worker!

Released today: episode #60 of my podcast series “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring Wilding discussing her book Trust Yourself. Click on https://newbooksnetwork.com/category/special-series/dan-hills-eq-spotlight to get to the new episode. 

An image of the author Melody Wilding and her new book "Trust Yourself: Stop Overthinking and Channel Your Emotions for Success at Work" for Dan Hill's EQ Spotlight podcast episode 60.

Melody Wilding has been named one of Business Insider’s “Most Innovative Coaches” with clients across a range of Fortune 500 companies. Her work has been featured in The New York Times, Oprah Magazine, Fast Company, The Washington Post, and elsewhere. She received her master’s degree in social work from Columbia University. 

Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest books, available on Amazon are Emotionomics 2.0: The Emotional Dynamics Underlying Key Business Goals and Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo.

Getting Some Love (and Money, Too)

Image with the Question: What number of powerpoint slides should entrepreneurs use in pitching their start-up company to venture capitalists? The choices are 5 slides, 15 slides or 25 slides. What’s your guess?

The correct answer to this week’s quiz is 15 slides, following the title slide. That number comes courtesy of Debi Kleiman, who’s seen it all; she’s witnessed over 1,000 pitches by the entrepreneurs of start-up companies based on her own business world experiences. Having been the Executive Director of the center for entrepreneurship at Babson College, the nation’s #1 school for entrepreneurship, Kleiman developed a pitch deck formula she calls the 4-H Framework: Headline, Heart, Head and Hope. A good pitch hits all four bases, and the pitch might be a home run if delivered well. Sadly, the odds don’t favor females, who receive a measly 2% of all venture funding despite owning 38% of all the businesses in America. No wonder Silicon Valley has also been called the Uncanny Valley, a reference to what it feels like to have to interact with uncaring robots!

Released today: episode #59 of my podcast series “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring Kleiman discussing her book First Pitch. Click on https://newbooksnetwork.com/category/special-series/dan-hills-eq-spotlight to get to the new episode. 

Debi Kleiman is now the managing partner of The Upside Angels, investing in early-stage startups and providing strategic advisory services to founders. After her BS from Cornell University and her MBA from Harvard University, worked at Coca-Cola, Welch’s, Procter & Gamble, and Babson College before launching her own firm.

Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest books, available on Amazon are Emotionomics 2.0: The Emotional Dynamics Underlying Key Business Goals and Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo.

Tesla: The Poster Child of Context Marketing

The correct answer is C because for the Model 3, for instance, Tesla has spent about $6 on advertising for every model it’s sold. How is that possible? The answer is that Tesla leads the way in changing the business model from build / market / sell to market / sell / build and market some more. Tesla does so by having a values-based purpose out ahead of the traditional value proposition, i.e., Tesla aims to rid the world of fossil fuels. That positioning earns Tesla free media and buyer loyalty. And Tesla goes further by inviting consumers to provide input on where its showrooms are located, how they want to configure their own cars based on guidance from an owner advisor, and a referral program with a $1,000 cash incentive to both the owner and the friend who purchases based on a referral. The result is that Tesla has 22% of the electric car market, Mercedes-Benz 5%. 

Released today: episode #51 of “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring Mathew Sweezey, the author of The Context Marketing Revolution: How to Motivate Buyers in the Age of Infinite MediaCheck out the audio link below to get oriented or click here to get to the new episode.

Mathew Sweezey is the Director of Market Strategy for Salesforce. Mathew is the host of the award-winning podcast The Electronic Propaganda Society and an accomplished author, having written for The EconomistForbes, the Harvard Business Review, and AdAge

Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest books, available on Amazon are Emotionomics 2.0: The Emotional Dynamics Underlying Key Business Goals and Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo.

Making Company Culture Something Real

AN image of the question "Tell me about something you’ve invented” a the question Twilio CEO Jeff Lawson asks of job candidates wanting to join his company.

In the book, The CEO Test, which executive “aced the exam”? I would vote for Jeff Lawson, the CEO of Twilio, a cloud communications platform company. Why? Lawson allows for very little daylight between Twilio’s espoused values and how the company actual operates. Here is how Lawson pulls off that feat:

  • First, the company’s values were formulated based on broad input from current employees, not just as an exercise controlled by the c-suite.
  • Second, those values are carried forward to future employees by being front and center during the hiring and onboarding processes. The “invention” question above is but one example, given the goal of ensuring every employee likewise has a “builder mentality,” which is one of Twilio’s core values.
  • Third, quarterly and annual employee awards, as well as all promotions, involve honoring employees who embody the company’s values. The converse is that violating those values is cause for the firing of even high-performing “culture felons.”

Released today: episode #49 of “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring Adam Bryant, the co-author, along with former Amgen CEO Kevin Sharer of The CEO Test: Master the Challenges That Make or Break All Leaders. Check out the audio link below to get oriented or click on https://newbooksnetwork.com/category/special-series/dan-hills-eq-spotlight to get to the new episode.

Image of Author Adam Bryant and the cover of his new book "The CEO Test: Master the Challenges that Make or Break All Leaders" For Dan Hill's EQ Spotlight podcast "The X-Factors That Set the Best Leaders Apart" episode 49

Adam Bryant is managing director of Merryck & Co, a leadership development and mentoring firm. Before that gig, Bryant was a journalist for 30 years, including at the New York Times where he authored the “Corner Office” column. In addition, he’s a frequent contributor on CNBC.

Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest books, available on Amazon are Emotionomics 2.0: The Emotional Dynamics Underlying Key Business Goals and Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo.

Why Walking the Talk Doesn’t Propel Culture Change

The typical large American company is estimated to spend $2,200 per employee, per year, trying to manage its corporate culture. That amount equals over $60 billion annually.

Like a three-car pile-up on a freeway, consider these statistics: two-thirds of all business mergers fail; under 30% of executives think their company manages its culture well; and only 10% of HR leaders would go that far. Walking the talk doesn’t work. Who needs to hear more about a company’s “values” or “mission statement”? Trying to instill behaviors based on high-minded rhetoric isn’t nearly enough. Instead, a company’s basic operating system requires change if progress is to be made. That move means changing the habits and routines—the practices—that both drive and reflect the company’s true culture. What is also needed? Executives must ditch overconfidence in favor of psychological flexibility, the competency Israeli thought leader Yuval Harari has called the single most important passport to success in the 21stcentury.

Released today: episode #46 of “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring David G. White, Jr., the author of Disrupting Corporate Culture: How Cognitive Science Alters Accepted Beliefs about Culture and Culture Change and Its Impact on Leaders and Change AgentsCheck out the audio link below to get oriented or click on the image below to go directly to the new episode.

Image of the author, David G. White Jr's and the cover of his book "Disrupting Corporate Culture" for Dan Hill's EQ Spotlight Podcast episode 46, entitled "You are What You Do"

David G. White, Jr. is cognitive anthropologist working with organizations on culture, change, and leadership issues. He’s the co-founder of Ontos Global, a boutique consulting firm. David previously held leadership roles at Microsoft, Mercer, and IBM; and is also a professional jazz musician with 7 CDs.

Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest books, available on Amazon are Emotionomics 2.0: The Emotional Dynamics Underlying Key Business Goals and Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo.