Men: Hard Facts, Real Solutions

The statistics are stunning. Men have a 9% lower graduation rate from college. One in three men without a completed high school education are now out of the workforce. About 40% of births take place outside of marriage (up from 11% in 1970). And men are 50% more likely to die from Covid-19 than women after contracting the virus. The long and short of it, while also advocating for full, real opportunities for women, short shrift is often being given to the problems men face. Neither ignoring the problem (the liberal choice, often) or suggesting we turn-back-the-clock to the 1950s (the conservative choice, often) will suffice. In this episode, Richard Reeves dares to propose some real solutions regarding education reforms, workplace opportunities, and pro-childrearing roles for all dads, married or otherwise.

Released today: episode #119 of my podcast series “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring Richard Reeves discussing Of Boys and Men: Why the Modern Male Is Struggling, Why It Matters, and What To Do About It. Click on https://newbooksnetwork.com/category/special-series/dan-hills-eq-spotlight to get to the new episode.

Richard Reeves is a senior fellow in economic studies at the Brookings Institution. He’s the author of the 2017 book Dream Hoarders and is also a regular contributor to The New York Times, Washington Post, Wall Street Journal, and The Atlantic.

Images of author Richard V. Reeves and his new book titled "Of Boys and Men: Why the Modern Male Is Struggling, Why It Matters, and What To Do About It" for Dan Hill's EQ Spotlight Podcast, episode number 119, titled "Men: Hard Facts, Real Solutions". Available on the "NewBooks Network" Podcast.
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Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest books, available on Amazon are Emotionomics 2.0: The Emotional Dynamics Underlying Key Business Goals and Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo.

Are Labor Markets Competitive?

When anti-trust cases are brought forward, typically they involve monopolies exercising undue power related to products or services. Rarely do labor issues get the same treatment. Posner points in this episode to why the laws may need strengthening. Issues include stagnant wages, and the use and abuse of non-poaching, non-complete and arbitration clauses in the contracts that workers sign. Add in the practice of gig workers and rising inequality issues related to household wealth, and you can’t find a more-timely topic than this one.

Released today: episode #115 of my podcast series “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring Eric Posner discussing How Antitrust Failed Workers. Click on https://newbooksnetwork.com/category/special-series/dan-hills-eq-spotlight to get to the new episode.

Images of author --- and his new book titled "How Antitrust Failed Workers" for Dan Hill's EQ Spotlight Podcast, episode number 115, titled "Are Labor Markets Competitive". Available on the "NewBooks Network" Podcast.

Eric Posner is a professor of Law at the University of Chicago. He’s currently on leave and working for the Anti-Trust Division of the U.S. Justice Department. (Note that his views do not necessarily reflect those of the Justice Department.) Two previous books by Posner were each separately chosen as a book of the year in 2018, one by The Economist and the other by The Financial Times.

Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest book available on Amazon is Emotionomics 2.0: The Emotional Dynamics Underlying Key Business Goals.

Dare To Be Remembered

For this week’s guest Greg Hoffman, the characteristics of empathy and curiosity are central to everything from finding your place in the world, to connecting with others, to building a brand that exhibits a true sense of purpose by empowering people to realize their potential. Along the way, this episode also explores both the value and limits of data-driven marketing takes on the central role of smartphones today, and goes back into Hoffman’s own backstory as a mixed-race child growing up in a nearly all-white suburb of Minneapolis. In art and sports, Hoffman found a path forward.

Released today: episode #110 of my podcast series “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring Greg Hoffman discussing Emotion by Design: Creative Leadership Lessons from a Life at Nike. Click on https://newbooksnetwork.com/category/special-series/dan-hills-eq-spotlight to get to the new episode.

Images of author --- and his new book titled "Emotion By Design: Creative Leadership Lessons From a Life at Nike" for Dan Hill's EQ Spotlight Podcast, episode number 110, titled "Dare To Be Remembered". Available on the "NewBooks Network" Podcast.

Greg Hoffman is a global brand leader, advisor, speaker, and former Nike Chief Marketing Office. He’s now the founder and principal of the brand advisory group Modern Arena as well as a branding instructor at the University of Oregon’s Lundquist School of Business and a member of the Board of Trustees at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design (MCAD).

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Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest books, available on Amazon are Emotionomics 2.0: The Emotional Dynamics Underlying Key Business Goals and Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo.

Woke Capitalism: Not What You Think It Is

When Milton Friedman published Capitalism and Freedom in 1962, whose freedom was he referring to anyway? When you know the answer is corporations, you begin to understand two things at once: 1) What neoliberalism was all about; and 2) Why today Woke Capitalism may not be so much a harbinger of socialism (as critics contend) as it is a way for the Powers-That-Be to distract from greater economic justice. At least that’s the vantagepoint of Carl Rhodes, whose book explores the plutocracy that America and other democratic countries are at risk of becoming, if they are not already there. Abraham Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address famously included the pledge that government “of the people, by the people, and for the people” shall not perish. Rhodes is warning, in effect, that the world of George Orwell’s Animal Farm in which some pigs are more equal than others may now be dangerously close to the truth.

Released today: episode #94 of my podcast series “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring Carl Rhodes discussing Woke Capitalism: How Corporate Morality Is Sabotaging Democracy. Click on https://newbooksnetwork.com/category/special-series/dan-hills-eq-spotlight to get to the new episode.

Images of Author Carl Rhodes and his new book titled "Woke Capitalism: How Corporate Morality is Sabotaging Democracy" for Dan Hill's EQ Spotlight Podcast episode 94. Available on "NewBooks Network."

Carl Rhodes is Professor of Organization Studies at the University of Technology Sydney. There he researches the ethical and democratic dimensions of business and work. Carl regularly writes for the mainstream and independent press alike, on issues related to ethics, policy, and the economy.

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Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest books, available on Amazon are Emotionomics 2.0: The Emotional Dynamics Underlying Key Business Goals and Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo.

Is For-Profit Health Insurance a Con Job?

From Thom Hartmann’s perspective, the battle over whether America should provide universal healthcare has been warped first by racism, then by greed. From the 1880’s to the 1980’s the idea of universal American healthcare was often opposed because it would aid African-Americans, too. Then from the Reagan Revolution to today, greed explains the delay in adopting universal healthcare because the current system favors industry insiders. Meanwhile, the average American pays more for less than is true elsewhere in the so-called Developed World. Get ready for plenty of surprises in this episode, like how the debate about healthcare got launched by three Germans: Karl Marx, Otto von Bismarck, and a person named Frederick Ludwig Hoffman. Never heard of the third guy? Well, at a time when Prudential was the biggest insurer in America, Hoffman became the company’s leading advocate for denying healthcare on racist grounds, thereby blunting the momentum to adopt universal healthcare that the German leader Bismarck had decided was a way to counter the appeal of Marxism.

Released today: episode #84 of my podcast series “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring Thom Hartmann discussing The Hidden History of American Healthcare: Why Sickness Bankrupts You and Makes Others Insanely Rich. Click on https://newbooksnetwork.com/category/special-series/dan-hills-eq-spotlight to get to the new episode.

Images of Author Thom Hartmann and his new Book "The Hidden History of American Healthcare: Why Sickness Bankrupts You and Makes Others Insanely Rich" for Dan Hill's New Books Network EQ Spotlight Podcast, Episode 84.

Thom Hartmann is a four-time winner of the Project Censored Award, a New York Times bestselling authority of 32 books, and America’s #1 progressive talk radio show host.

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Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest books, available on Amazon are Emotionomics 2.0: The Emotional Dynamics Underlying Key Business Goals and Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo.

Bringing Seemingly Irreconcilable Parties Together

You’re helping South Africa make the transition from apartheid to democracy under Nelson Mandela. You’re helping end a half-century long civil war in Columbia. You’re working with the First Nations in Canada to secure more respect for their heritage and traditions. That’s a sampling of the work Adam Kahane has been involved in during his career, basically reconciling parties often barely on speaking terms before Kahane intervenes to bring them together. Kahane’s approach draws inspiration from the likes of Martin Luther King, Jr. and the German existential theologian Paul Tillich. What does that approach involve? Why should you care to listen to this episode? The answer to both questions is that love offers unity, power, and the opportunity for self-realization, while justice looks to ensure that power gets employed to bring equity for all parties involved. If you’ve ever sought to resolve a conflict, this episode is for you.

Released today: episode #77 of my podcast series “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring Adam Kahane discussing Facilitating Breakthrough: How to Remove Obstacles, Bridge Differences, and Move Forward Together. Click on https://newbooksnetwork.com/category/special-series/dan-hills-eq-spotlight to get to the new episode.

Image of Adam Kahane and his new book "Facilitating Breakthrough:How to Move Through Obstacles, Bridge Differences, and Move Forward Together" for Dan Hill's EQ Spotlight podcast, episode 77 on NewBooks Network

Adam Kahane is the director of Reos Partners, an international social enterprise that helps people move forward together on their most important and intractable issues.

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Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest books, available on Amazon are Emotionomics 2.0: The Emotional Dynamics Underlying Key Business Goals and Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo.

Love Letters to Ourselves

What amount of selfies get posted to social media daily? The choices are 100 million, 500 million, and 1 billion. What’s your guess?

The correct answer to this week’s quiz is 100 million. As a percentage of the 2 billion images uploaded daily to social media daily, that’s only 5%. Nevertheless, 100 million is a lot of selfies in an era when it’s also estimated that every 3rd photograph taken by an 18-24 year-old person is of themselves. In 2006, Time magazine’s person of the year was “You.” That same year, Facebook became available to anyone with an email address and the selfie-stick was invented. Every selfie has been described as a “love letter to yourself,” and Rod Stewart has sung that every face tells a story. Bringing all of these—and more—fascinating strains together regarding what is happening within popular culture is Jessica Helfand in her fascinating, visually-rich book Face: An Visual Odyssey. Check it out!

Released today: episode #58 of my podcast series “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring Helfand and her book published by MIT Press in 2019. Click here to get to the new episode. 

Image of author Jessica Halfand and an image of her book "Face: A Visual Odyssey" for Dan Hill's EQ Spotlight Podcast episode #58 "Love Letters to Ourselves".

Jessica Helfand is a designer, artist, and writer. She taught at Yale University for over two decades, and has had additional roles at a variety of institutions ranging from the American Academy in Rome to the California Institute of Technology. Helfand also cofounded Design Observer.

Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest books, available on Amazon are Emotionomics 2.0: The Emotional Dynamics Underlying Key Business Goals and Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo.

On the 1st Anniversary of George Floyd’s Murder

Photo from Exhibit 17 from Derek Chauvin’s trial was a still-frame image of the police officer glaring at onlookers while his knees rested on George Floyd’s throat. What was Chauvin’s facial expression saying? The answer is both anger (tense lower right eyelid, wide open right eye and lowered eyebrows) as well as fear (eyebrows raised, creating a large wrinkle across Chauvin’s forehead) and Disgust  (curled upper lip and protruding lower lip)

This week marks the first anniversary of George Floyd’s death under the knee of Derek Chauvin. Much has been written about that tragedy, including an article a month ago by John Blake of CNN.

The thrust of Blake’s article—about the harm that indifference to injustice causes—I agree with. As an expert in analyzing facial expressions, however, I couldn’t disagree more with how Blake describes the look on Chauvin’s face as being “one of bored disinterest,” with the “only flicker of emotion” being “annoyance at the crowd” gathered to plead for Floyd’s life. This still-frame image (Exhibit 17 in Chauvin’s trial) actually tells a far different story. There isn’t just annoyance on display; there’s very real anger in how strongly Chauvin is glaring at the crowd. There’s fear, too, as at some level Chauvin must have known that having video bear witness to what was transpiring could put him in legal jeopardy. 

Finally, there’s a hint of a third emotion as well, namely disgust given how Chauvin’s upper lip curls a bit while the lower lip pushes down slightly. Disgust with the victim his knee is suffocating? Disgust with the crowd? With the idea that anybody would dare contest a policeman’s actions? Who’s to say. Disgust is an emotion Chauvin certainly won’t own up to as he appeals a guilty verdict as it would reveal a repugnance for the very people he was sworn to protect and serve.

What inspired you to write the book?

Released today: episode #55 of my podcast series “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight” on the New Books Network. The episode features Carla Diana, the author of My Robot Gets Me: How Social Design Can Make New Products More HumanClick here to get to the new episode.

Carla Diana is a robot designer responsible for the creative aspects of Diligent Robotics’ new hospital service robot named Moxi. She created and leads the 4D Design masters program at the Cranbrook Academy of Art, wrote the world’s first children’s book on 3D printing, Leo the Maker Prince, and she cohosts the Robopsych Podcast.

Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest books, available on Amazon are Emotionomics 2.0: The Emotional Dynamics Underlying Key Business Goals and Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo.

Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest books, available on Amazon are Emotionomics 2.0: The Emotional Dynamics Underlying Key Business Goals and Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo.

Of Daddy Wounds & Oil-Patch Drifters

When does 2% become 100%? The answer can be found in Michael Smith’s riveting book about working the oil boom in Williston, North Dakota. There he encounters The Williston Hello. Two short sentences kick off most initial meetings between the guys drifting into town. The first is “What kind of work you do?” The second is “Man, my dad whipped my ass!” Smith goes on to write: “That scar, that hole in a man’s soul the shape of his father, was a defining feature of every man I met in Williston. Men had built their lives around it. Like a tree growing around a hatchet,” as physical and psychological wounds meshed in guys taking on some of the toughest, coldest jobs in the world.

Released today: episode #45 of “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring Michael Patrick F. Smith, the author of The Good Hand: A Memoir of Work, Brotherhood, and Transformation in an American BoomtownCheck out the audio and video link below to get oriented or click on the image below to go directly to the new episode.

Michael Patrick F. Smith is a folk singer who has shared the stage with luminaries such as Ramblin’ Jack Elliott. He’s also a playwright, whose works include Woody Guthrie Dreams and Ain’t No Sin. The Good Hand is his first book.

Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest books, available on Amazon are Emotionomics 2.0: The Emotional Dynamics Underlying Key Business Goals and Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo.

The Shift from a Thinking to Feeling Economy

A summary of the main point from the book "The Feeling Economy" by Roland T. Rust and Ming-Hui Yuang, which is that we’ve gone from a Physical Economy (manufacturing) to a Thinking Economy (information) and are now entering a Feeling Economy (empathy).

Your career and future employability will depend on how you add value in a world where AI (artificial intelligence) + HI (human intelligence) are converging. Reading faces (facial coding), voices (e.g., Apple’s Siri) and bodies (via Fitbit) fit a world in which your emotional intelligence skills will be vital.

Here are some signposts of the basic socio-economic change underway from a thinking to feeling model:

1987: FCC repeals Fairness Doctrine, opening the way for Rush LimbaughFox News will launch in 1996

1995: Daniel Goleman publishes Emotional Intelligence

1997: Big Blue (IBM) defeats world chess champion Garry Kasparov; emojisfirst appear in Japanese mobile phones

1998: launch of Google & also Sensory Logic (my company, using facial coding to capture/quantify emotions)

2001: release of Stephen Spielberg movie AI Artificial Intelligence

2004: Facebook launches

2005: Malcolm Gladwell publishes Blink (which highlights facial coding)

2007: Fitbit launches; I release my book Emotionomics

2009: Lie to Me TV series based on facial coding launches on Fox (#29 most-viewed show that season); Affectiva and Realeyes switch to applying (automated) facial coding to business in imitation of Sensory Logic

2011: launch of the 1st digital assistant, Apple’s Siri

2014: SoftBank Robotic’s Pepperis 1st social humanoid robot

2016: Apple buys Emotient, the original facial coding automation company

2017: Female robot Sophia named an AI citizen in Saudi Arabia

Released today: episode #44 of “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring Ming-Hui Huang, the co-author of The Feeling Economy: How Artificial Intelligence Is Creating the Era of Empathy. Listen to the clip below and click on the image to get to the new episode.

Image of Author Ming-Hui Huang and her book "The Feeling Economy" for episode 44 of Dan Hill's EQ Spotlight, titled When A.I. Thinks, Humans Feel. Click on the image to get to podcast link.

Huang Ming-Hui Huang holds a number of posts. She’s a Distinguished Professor at National Taiwan University; a fellow of the European Marketing Academy (EMAC); an International Research Fellow of the Centre for Corporate Reputation, University of Oxford, UK; and a Distinguished Research Fellow of the Center for Excellence in Service, University of Maryland, USA. She is also the incoming Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Service Research.

Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest books, available on Amazon are Emotionomics 2.0: The Emotional Dynamics Underlying Key Business Goals and Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo.