Did the Civil War Ever End?

Quote by the American novelist William Faulkner who wrote about how the past shapes the present in Requiem for a Nun  "The past is never dead."

On January 6th, a participant in the mob storming the Capitol was seen inside the building carrying a Confederate flag defiantly. The ghost of novelist William Faulkner might have smiled at such a sight, not in support of the Rebel cause but because Faulkner believed the past gets repeated endlessly—that what was is never over. That reality applies to nations and individuals alike.

Released today: episode #38 of “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring Michael Gorra, the author of The Saddest Words: William Faulkner’s Civil WarListen to the clip below and click on the image to get to the new episode.

The author of Portrait of a Novel, a finalist for the Pulitzer Prize, Michael Gorra is the Mary Augusta Jordan Professor of English Language and Literature at Smith College and the editor of the Norton Critical Editions of As I Lay Dyingand The Sound and the Fury.

This episode touches on two of William Faulkner’s novels in particular: The Sound and the Fury as well as Absalom, Absalom! It considers the role of memory and history, Faulkner’s alcoholism, the sexual exploitation practiced by plantation owners, and the greater presence of Nathan Bedford Forrest over Robert E. Lee in Faulkner’s fiction writings. Ties to today’s reckoning for racial justice is a part of the episode, too.

Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc.

Working up a Sweat

Quote: Between 1965 and 2009, the amount of time Americans sit around increased by 43%. Daniel E. Lieberman

It’s a typical New Year’s resolution: you’re going to get in better shape. To do it, you’ll eat less or healthier and you’re also going to exercise more. Here’s the math. For the average adult American weighing 180 pounds, total daily energy expenditure is about 2,700 calories. Maintaining our body, i.e., our resting metabolism, will cover only 1,700 of those calories.

Where can you “pick up the slack” by expending another 1,000 calories each day? You might still be growing. You might be sexually active. You might be otherwise physically active, i.e., exercise. Those are your options. Otherwise, that extra 1,000 calories will go towards storing energy, i.e., getting fatter.

Human beings have not evolved to use up extra calories through exercise, even though that would be healthier. We inherited a survival strategy based on reserving our extra calories, a trait that has helped us stay alive and reproduce in the past. If we have not inherited an instinct to help us work up a sweat, what will motivate us? The answers is making it fun, including: exercising with friends, doing so while entertaining yourself, as part of a game, in a nice setting, and adding variety to exercise routines. Finally, set realistic goals in order to stay with it. Use those tips to make your life span and health span overlap.

Despite Not Evolving to Exercise, It’s Healthy

Released today: episode #35 of “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring Daniel E. Lieberman, the author of Exercised: Why Something We Never Evolved to Do Is Healthy and RewardingListen to the clip below and click on the image to get to the new episode.

Photo of Author Daniel E. Lieberman and a photo of his new book: Exercised Why Something We Never Evolved to Do is Healthy and Rewarding. Episode 35 of Dan Hill's EQ Spotlight podcast "Despite Not Evolving to Exercise, It's Healthy"

Lieberman is the Lerner Professor of Biological Sciences in the Department of Human Evolutionary Biology at Harvard University. He received degrees from Harvard and Cambridge Universities. This episode isn’t about how to exercise (more) but, rather, why exercise is important and the myths that surround it. A key part of the conversation is a comparison between Westerners and non-Westerners, especially in Africa, to offer insights of what kind of historic lifestyle patterns Americans now run the risk of violating.

Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc.

Nature vs. Nurture

It’s a debate that’s been around since Sir Francis Galton, a relative of Charles Darwin, coined the term “nature versus nurture.” Does one factor matter more than another? In my interview with IQ scholar Russell Warne, he couldn’t say precisely how much each factor contributes. 

Nevertheless, a couple of other statements from his book give guidance. First, as we age, the degree to which our environment (nurture) influences our development and behavior recedes in favor of what we inherited though our genes (nature). Second, with adults in positive environments in industrialized countries (typically the West), the heritability of intelligence is about 80%. In other words, ultimately, nature wins for many of us in America.

It’s the holiday season at the end of a very bleak year. The chances are higher than usual that you haven’t been gathering with your parents this gift-giving season. But if you are, this might prove an opportunity to reflect on what you inherited from them: one’s IQ level to a fair degree, no doubt, but personality traits and behavior and habits as well. Here’s to wishing everyone well, and a better 2021!

An Accessible Guide to Being Smart about IQ

Released today: episode #34 of “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring Russell T. Warne, the author of In the Know: Debunking 35 Myths about Human IntelligenceListen to the clip below and click on the image to get to the new episode.

Warne is Associate Professor of Psychology at Utah Valley University. He earned his PhD in education psychology from Texas A&M in 2011. Dr. Warne has published two books and nearly 60 scholarly articles. The publisher of In the Know is Cambridge University Press. This episode covers the specific ways in which IQ can be bolstered (mostly physical factors) versus hyped interventions. The episode also touches on how “intellectual meritocracy” is unfortunately contributing to the country’s polarization.

Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc.