Re-Imagining Your Company

Since the 1990s, the fade rate or inability of companies to stay ahead of their closest rivals, has gone from sustaining a lead, on average for 10 years, to now a single year. So focusing on innovation alone won’t suffice. A company that will survive and thrive must re-imagine every aspect of the its culture and operations in order to succeed. That re-imagining requires an open mind and an inquisitive spirit, not averse to surprises but instead, willing to embrace them. Who better than these two authors to take on that task? Martin Reeves is in his own words a “failed” musician and biologist turned businessperson, and Jack Fuller is versed in philosophical theology. Together, they are a perfect team for exploring how organizations can even change their very “souls”.

Released today: episode #73 of my podcast series “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring Martin Reeves and Jack Fuller discussing The Imagination Machine: How to Spark New Ideas and Create Your Company’s Future. Click on https://newbooksnetwork.com/category/special-series/dan-hills-eq-spotlight to get to the new episode.

Images for Authors Martin Reeves and Jack Fuller, and their new book "The Imagination Machine: How to Spark Ideas and Create Your Company's Future" for Dan Hill's EQ Spotlight podcast, episode 73.

Martin Reeves is a Senior Partner and Managing Director at BCG, i.e., the Boston Consulting Group. He’s also the Chairman of the BCG Henderson Institute, BCG’s internal think tank. Jack Fuller is a former special project manager at the BCG Henderson Institute, and the founder of Casati Health, a company that re-imagines mental and physical health. He’s a Rhodes Scholar with a background that combines neuroscience and philosophical theology.

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Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest book, available on Amazon is Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo.

Women Rightfully Seizing the Throne (or a Share of It)

An image of the question: "By how much does a company’s profit margin grow by having lots of female executives?" The choices are A) 5 times as high, B) 10 times as high, and C) 15 times as high.

The correct answer is B. As recounted in Angelica Malin’s new book, in which a study of the largest 250 companies on the London Stock Exchange found that companies with more than one third of women in their executive committees enjoyed a profit margin greater than ten times higher. Most times, money talks – or to quote Bob Dylan: “Money doesn’t talk, it swears.” So . . . why in the world haven’t more companies pursued a policy of adding more female executives? Is it possible that (white) male leaders are choosing their own comfort level over what would aid the company? Is it possible they are simply unwilling to share the “reins of power” out of fears of being replaced? One’s head spins given all the interpretative possibilities of such a stark, startling statistic. Malin’s book is nothing if not a call for more female entrepreneurship, more empowerment, more determination than ever to break through. No wonder the book is dedicated in part to Taylor Swift.

Released today: episode #71 of my podcast series “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring Angelica Malin McDargh discussing She Made It: The Toolkit for Female Founders in the Digital Age. Click here to get to the new episode.

Images of Author Angelica Malin and her new book "She Made It. The Tool Kit for Female Founders in the Digital Age" for Dan Hill's EQ Spotlight podcast , episode 71.

Angelica Malin is the Editor-in-Chief of About Time Magazine and she’s the UK’s rising voice for championing women founders and entrepreneurs. She’s appeared on BBC News and LBC Business Hour and has been featured in The Telegraph, Forbes, and Real Business.

Image of NewBooks Network logo and Dan HIll's EQ Spotlight podcast logo

Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest book, available on Amazon is Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo.