When Inches and Feet Feel Like Miles

Image of the question "What's the percentage of Americans who feel lonely?" the options for the answers are A) 30%, B) 40% and C) 50%.

The correct answer is C, as it comes the closest to the actual percentage of Americans reporting that they feel lonely: 47%. In other words, nearly one of every two Americans feel psychologically if not physically isolated, too. At work, job insecurity and working-from-home (WFH) can be contributors. When I mentioned to HR consultant Caroline Stokes in a previous interview the estimate is that 25% of all bosses qualify as bullies, Stokes thought that percentage was too low. Add to that mix difficult bosses, then a worker’s day can seem even longer. When loneliness induces sadness (which it typically does), a sense of helplessness and hopelessness can settle in, depriving a person of the energy to get things done and also interact with others. A good manager might intervene to correct that vicious cycle, but not a bully boss. If you’re in an office setting, your desk may be near other colleagues but do you feel connected to them? My favorite statistic of late is that there are only 18 inches separating the head and the heart, but, oh-what-a-distance that can prove to be!

Released today: episode #70 of my podcast series “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring Eileen McDargh discussing Burnout to Breakthrough: Building Resilience to Refuel, Recharge, and Reclaim What Matters. Click here to get to the new episode.

An image of Author Eileen McDorgh and and image of her new book "Burnout to Breakthrough: Building Resilience to Refuel, Recharge, and Reclaim What Matters" for Dan Hill's EQ Spotlight podcast episode 70 titled "Cultivating Resilience in Upside-Down Times"

Eileen McDargh is the CEO (Chief Energy Officer) at the Resiliency Group. In 2019, Global Gurus International ranked her first among the World’s Top 30 Communication Professionals. She’s also been elected into the CPAE Speaker Hall of Fame, placing her among the top 3% of speakers in America.

Image of NewBooks Network logo and Dan HIll's EQ Spotlight podcast logo

Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest book, available on Amazon is Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo.

Why a Good Meeting Agenda Isn’t Enough to Ensure Value

In a recent blog posting by Michael Hyatt entitled “The Secret to Great Meetings: Preparation,” Hyatt offers three useful suggestions. They consist of:

1) Designate a meeting leader and facilitator

2) Construct a carefully planned agenda

3) Pick the right setting.

The second point ensures the meeting has a primary purpose, with two or three desired outcomes.

Is that enough? Probably not suggests Ann Latham in her new book The Power of Clarity. After all, outcomes that come from meetings often amount to nothing more than “let’s study this further” or “so-and-so will circle back with some ideas for next time.” Instead, Latham argues in favor of a firmer standard: what is tangibly different as a result of discussing the issue during the meeting? Only then will real progress happen.

Released today: episode #69 of my podcast series “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring Ann Latham discussing The Power of Clarity: Unleash the True Potential of Workplace Productivity, Confidence, and Empowerment. Click on https://newbooksnetwork.com/category/special-series/dan-hills-eq-spotlight to get to the new episode.

Ann Latham has consulted for major global companies like Boeing and Medtronic, as well as Public Television, and she’s the author of two other books: The Clarity Papers and Uncommon Meetings. She’s been interviewed by The New York times, Bloomberg Business Week, and Forbes, where she’s also an expert blogger.

Image of NewBooks Network logo and Dan HIll's EQ Spotlight podcast logo

Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest book, available on Amazon is Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo.