Dare To Be Remembered

For this week’s guest Greg Hoffman, the characteristics of empathy and curiosity are central to everything from finding your place in the world, to connecting with others, to building a brand that exhibits a true sense of purpose by empowering people to realize their potential. Along the way, this episode also explores both the value and limits of data-driven marketing takes on the central role of smartphones today, and goes back into Hoffman’s own backstory as a mixed-race child growing up in a nearly all-white suburb of Minneapolis. In art and sports, Hoffman found a path forward.

Released today: episode #110 of my podcast series “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring Greg Hoffman discussing Emotion by Design: Creative Leadership Lessons from a Life at Nike. Click on https://newbooksnetwork.com/category/special-series/dan-hills-eq-spotlight to get to the new episode.

Images of author --- and his new book titled "Emotion By Design: Creative Leadership Lessons From a Life at Nike" for Dan Hill's EQ Spotlight Podcast, episode number 110, titled "Dare To Be Remembered". Available on the "NewBooks Network" Podcast.

Greg Hoffman is a global brand leader, advisor, speaker, and former Nike Chief Marketing Office. He’s now the founder and principal of the brand advisory group Modern Arena as well as a branding instructor at the University of Oregon’s Lundquist School of Business and a member of the Board of Trustees at the Minneapolis College of Art and Design (MCAD).

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Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest books, available on Amazon are Emotionomics 2.0: The Emotional Dynamics Underlying Key Business Goals and Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo.

High Wages: The Engine of Economic Growth and Well-Being

What sometimes gets overlooked is that Adam Smith not only became the “father of capitalism” by writing The Wealth of Nations; he also wrote The Theory of Moral Sentiments. Empathy matters, and this week’s guest Morris Altman argues that sustainable capitalism practices fairness. Too often the basic economic needs of rank-and-file workers are overlooked in a global economic where the wealthy call the shots. From anti-immigrant rhetoric to events in Ukraine, this is a timely episode that subjects the purported move from shareholder capitalism to stakeholder capitalism to skeptical examination. Want more engaged workers? To achieve that goal, make them more truly empowered, with their input acted on and rewarded alike.

Released today: episode #106A of my podcast series “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring Morris Altman, discussing Worker Satisfaction and Economic Performance. Click on https://newbooksnetwork.com/category/special-series/dan-hills-eq-spotlight to get to the new episode.

Images of author --- and his new book titled "Worker Satisfaction and Economic Performance: Microfoundations of Success and Failure" for Dan Hill's EQ Spotlight Podcast, episode number 106, titled "High Wages: The Engine of Economic Growth & Well-Being". Available on the "NewBooks Network" Podcast.

Morris Altman is the Dean of the University of Dundee’s School of Business. He’s published over 130 referred papers and 17 books. He’s also held academic posts at the University of Saskatchewan, Victoria University, Newcastle University, and at Hebrew University, Stanford, Cornell and Duke.

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Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest books, available on Amazon are Emotionomics 2.0: The Emotional Dynamics Underlying Key Business Goals and Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo.

An Antidote to the Great Resignation

What’s the overall theme of this episode? Inspiring greater empathy in the workplace. What makes it imperative for companies to pay attention now? The Great Resignation, which is really the Great Self-Realization. In other words, employees are realizing what matters to them and are changing jobs and careers to better align with their own values and desire to be themselves on the job. What’s standing in their way, prompting the wave of resignations? As DDS Dobson-Smith notes, too often the answer is executives who implore employees to change while not really taking a candid look at their own stale assumptions. The bottom line here is that empathy and inclusion go hand-in-hand.

Released today: episode #103 of my podcast series “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring DDS Dobson-Smith, discussing You Can Be Yourself Here: Your Pocket Guide to Creating Inclusive Workplaces by Using the Psychology of Belonging. Click on https://newbooksnetwork.com/category/special-series/dan-hills-eq-spotlight to get to the new episode.

Images of author --- and his new book titled "You can Be Yourself Here: Your Pocket Guide to Creating Inclusive Workplaces By Using the Psychology of Belonging" for Dan Hill's EQ Spotlight Podcast episode number 103, titled "An Antidote to the Great Resignation". Available on the "NewBooks Network" Podcast.

DDS Dobson-Smith is the founder of the executive coaching consultancy Soul Trained and was certified as an Executive Coach by the Oxford School of Coaching and Mentoring. Prior to founding Soul Trained, he held senior roles at Marks & Spencer, Eurostar International, Sony Music Entertainment, and the world’s largest advertising agency, WPP.

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Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest books, available on Amazon are Emotionomics 2.0: The Emotional Dynamics Underlying Key Business Goals and Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo.

Tackling Adversity through Empathy

The Director-General of the World Health Organization (WHO) has called Covid-19 more traumatic than World War Two. Add other still prevalent issues like racism, sexism, and inequality, and there’s never been a more important moment for leaders to step up and prove their empathetic abilities. What are the limiting beliefs that can hinder empathy? As this week’s guest Gautham Pallapa observes, too often being the “strong silent type” means that leaders may practice cognition empathy, but then fail to progress beyond that stage to emotional and compassionate empathy. What do those two stages of empathy entail? The answer is forming a real connection with others, feeling their pain points, and enacting change. In this episode, the emphasis is on creating psychological safety so employees can collaborate, innovate and create not just a better work/life balance, but a better work/soul balance.

Released today: episode #96 of my podcast series “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring Gautham Pallapa, PhD, discussing Leading with Empathy: Understanding the Needs of Today’s Workforce. Click on https://newbooksnetwork.com/category/special-series/dan-hills-eq-spotlight to get to the new episode.

Images of author Gautham Pallapa and his new book titled "Leading with Empathy: Understanding the Needs of Today's Workforce" for Dan Hill's EQ Spotlight Podcast episode number 96, titled "Tackling Adversity through Empathy". Available on the "NewBooks Network.

Gautham Pallapa, PhD, is the founder of Transformity and an executive advisor at VMware. Gautham was born in Bangalore, India and received his PhD from the University of Texas, Arlington.

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Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest books, available on Amazon are Emotionomics 2.0: The Emotional Dynamics Underlying Key Business Goals and Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo.

Shifting Our Lens

Greater social inclusivity can, at times, seem to take forever. It wasn’t until 1967, for instance, that bans on interracial marriages were finally declared unconstitutional in America. How appalling that such a hallmark of diversity would have taken so long. And yet a decade earlier, a mere 4% of surveyed Americans were in support of interracial marriages, a number that today stands at 87% approval. Clearly, progress has been made in a country whose citizens are often multiracial as well as in interracial marriages and relationships. How can the momentum for accepting people as they are be sustained in these divisive times?  Soo Bong Peer’s suggestions are of both a personal and systemic nature, ranging from practicing greater empathy to having leaders dialogue more often with employees distinctly different in backgrounds, experiences and perspectives from themselves. One specific idea Peer suggests is that rather than lecture-style, lunch-n-learn sessions at company headquarters, why not try for Friday “movie lunches” instead! She cites as inspiration long-time movie critic Roger Ebert and his remark that “movies are like a machine that generates empathy.” If seeing is believing, then getting executives, managers and employees at large to see on screen lives lived in circumstances far different from their own might help enable a warmer, more inclusive spirit in corporate America.

Released today: episode #74 of my podcast series “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring Soo Bong Peer discussing The Essential Diversity Mindset: How to Cultivate a More Inclusive Culture and Environment . Click on https://newbooksnetwork.com/category/special-series/dan-hills-eq-spotlight to get to the new episode.

Image of Author Soo Bong Peer and her new book "The Essential Diversity Mindset How to Clutivate a More Inclusive Culture and Environment" for Dan Hill's EQ Spotlight episode 74 titled "shifting Our Lens"

Soo Bong Peer is a strategy consultant and executive coach for Fortune 500 companies. The daughter of a prominent South Korean general and ambassador to Mexico, she has lived in multiple countries, including the U.S. for the past 50 years.

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Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest books, available on Amazon are Emotionomics 2.0: The Emotional Dynamics Underlying Key Business Goals and Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo.

The Shift from a Thinking to Feeling Economy

A summary of the main point from the book "The Feeling Economy" by Roland T. Rust and Ming-Hui Yuang, which is that we’ve gone from a Physical Economy (manufacturing) to a Thinking Economy (information) and are now entering a Feeling Economy (empathy).

Your career and future employability will depend on how you add value in a world where AI (artificial intelligence) + HI (human intelligence) are converging. Reading faces (facial coding), voices (e.g., Apple’s Siri) and bodies (via Fitbit) fit a world in which your emotional intelligence skills will be vital.

Here are some signposts of the basic socio-economic change underway from a thinking to feeling model:

1987: FCC repeals Fairness Doctrine, opening the way for Rush LimbaughFox News will launch in 1996

1995: Daniel Goleman publishes Emotional Intelligence

1997: Big Blue (IBM) defeats world chess champion Garry Kasparov; emojisfirst appear in Japanese mobile phones

1998: launch of Google & also Sensory Logic (my company, using facial coding to capture/quantify emotions)

2001: release of Stephen Spielberg movie AI Artificial Intelligence

2004: Facebook launches

2005: Malcolm Gladwell publishes Blink (which highlights facial coding)

2007: Fitbit launches; I release my book Emotionomics

2009: Lie to Me TV series based on facial coding launches on Fox (#29 most-viewed show that season); Affectiva and Realeyes switch to applying (automated) facial coding to business in imitation of Sensory Logic

2011: launch of the 1st digital assistant, Apple’s Siri

2014: SoftBank Robotic’s Pepperis 1st social humanoid robot

2016: Apple buys Emotient, the original facial coding automation company

2017: Female robot Sophia named an AI citizen in Saudi Arabia

Released today: episode #44 of “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring Ming-Hui Huang, the co-author of The Feeling Economy: How Artificial Intelligence Is Creating the Era of Empathy. Listen to the clip below and click on the image to get to the new episode.

Image of Author Ming-Hui Huang and her book "The Feeling Economy" for episode 44 of Dan Hill's EQ Spotlight, titled When A.I. Thinks, Humans Feel. Click on the image to get to podcast link.

Huang Ming-Hui Huang holds a number of posts. She’s a Distinguished Professor at National Taiwan University; a fellow of the European Marketing Academy (EMAC); an International Research Fellow of the Centre for Corporate Reputation, University of Oxford, UK; and a Distinguished Research Fellow of the Center for Excellence in Service, University of Maryland, USA. She is also the incoming Editor-in-Chief of the Journal of Service Research.

Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest books, available on Amazon are Emotionomics 2.0: The Emotional Dynamics Underlying Key Business Goals and Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo.

Three Reasons Why We Care

Evolutionary psychology suggests that being kind-hearted to those we don’t know isn’t a natural instinct. Quote by Author Michael McCullough

What’s our kindness to strangers rooted in? Look to these three R’s:

  1. Reciprocity – a social instinct to help others in hopes of receiving help in return.
  2. Reputation – a social instinct to help others though ultimately in pursuit of self-glory, i.e., appearing virtuous.
  3. Reasoning – an intellectual determination that there are beneficial incentives for doing so.

What’s the difference between the first two R’s and the last one? Reciprocity and Reputation go strictly back to “me”: either wanting to attract allies so we can be safer and happier (Reciprocity), or wanting to feel better about ourselves (Reputation). The third R, Reasoning, offers plenty of overlap with the first two R’s, but ultimately comes down to a hard-edged cost/benefit analysis, stripped of emotion. You’re after prosperity, and the more resources you have the lower will be the relative cost of helping others.

For instance, you might aid trading partners down on their luck, figuring they will then be in a position to buy more from you later on if revitalized. The bottom line, McCullough argues, is that human beings aren’t readily given to helping strangers. It often takes the addition of the harsher 3rd R to push us toward being “kind.”

The world’s great religions–and the Golden Rule–were born as the volume of people our ancestors were interacting with was growing rapidly. Today, international trade is helping to drive the value of being seen as trustworthy even higher.

The Historical Progression of Empathy

Released today: episode #25 of “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring Michael McCullough, the author of The Kindness of Strangers: How a Selfish Ape Invented a New Moral Code. Listen to the clip below and click on the image to get to the new episode.

Michael McCullough is a professor of psychology at the University of California San Diego. He’s a fellow of both the American Psychological Association as well as the Society for Personality and Social Psychology. This episode first covers why people practice empathy and compassion, followed by seven stages of history whereby compassion became more generally practiced, and why.

Dan Hill, Ph.D, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc.