Are Labor Markets Competitive?

When anti-trust cases are brought forward, typically they involve monopolies exercising undue power related to products or services. Rarely do labor issues get the same treatment. Posner points in this episode to why the laws may need strengthening. Issues include stagnant wages, and the use and abuse of non-poaching, non-complete and arbitration clauses in the contracts that workers sign. Add in the practice of gig workers and rising inequality issues related to household wealth, and you can’t find a more-timely topic than this one.

Released today: episode #115 of my podcast series “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring Eric Posner discussing How Antitrust Failed Workers. Click on https://newbooksnetwork.com/category/special-series/dan-hills-eq-spotlight to get to the new episode.

Images of author --- and his new book titled "How Antitrust Failed Workers" for Dan Hill's EQ Spotlight Podcast, episode number 115, titled "Are Labor Markets Competitive". Available on the "NewBooks Network" Podcast.

Eric Posner is a professor of Law at the University of Chicago. He’s currently on leave and working for the Anti-Trust Division of the U.S. Justice Department. (Note that his views do not necessarily reflect those of the Justice Department.) Two previous books by Posner were each separately chosen as a book of the year in 2018, one by The Economist and the other by The Financial Times.

Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest book available on Amazon is Emotionomics 2.0: The Emotional Dynamics Underlying Key Business Goals.

Does Your Idea Scale?

Want to go on an exuberant, incisive ride through why so many initiatives flounder and how, conversely, you can increase the odds of success? Then listening to John List will be for you. List takes us through his favorite, highly relevant behavior economic principles: loss aversion, confirmation bias and framing among them. Then this episode digs into why 50 to 90% of initiatives fail to scale. List emphasizes the role that false positives and unscalable ingredients play. As to the secrets of building out an idea, knowing when to quit stands out for reasons worth listening in for. Finally, the importance of scaling a company’s corporate culture explains why the gladiatorial culture at Uber wasn’t sustainable at scale.

Released today: episode #114 of my podcast series “Dan Hill’s EQ Spotlight,” featuring John List  discussing  The Voltage Effect: How to Make Good Ideas Great and Great Ideas Scale. Click on https://newbooksnetwork.com/category/special-series/dan-hills-eq-spotlight to get to the new episode.

John List is a professor of economics at both the University of Chicago and the Australian National University. After being the chief economist at Uber and Lfyt, he now holds that role at Walmart. He’s also previously been on the Council of Economic Advisers for The White House.

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Dan Hill, PhD, is the president of Sensory Logic, Inc. His latest books, available on Amazon are Emotionomics 2.0: The Emotional Dynamics Underlying Key Business Goals and Blah, Blah, Blah: A Snarky Guide to Office Lingo.